Basic Social Networking Information

If you don’t know what social media networking is then you may wonder what it really is. Social networking is the grouping of individuals together into more specific and defined groups more like rural communities or possibly a neighborhood subdivision.

Although social media networking is possible in person like organizing a group of a specific interest today it is most popular with the use of internet where meeting new friends from all walks of life can be located in social networking sites that are being widely used worldwide.

The internet is filled with millions and millions of individuals who are looking forward to meeting new people, to gather, to share first-hand insider information and experiences about random things in life that on the latter, develops friendships and if possible, professional alliances. People also are now widely using social networking in their business endeavors and the services that they are offering. It is one way of having their company, products and services known all over the world. Social networking aids in driving more traffic to your website by bringing on line visitors to visit therefore which at one point in time bring you sales and new customers.

When talking about social communities, websites are the most commonly used platform to be able to engage in social networking. These websites are also known as social sites allowing users to network with each other. The socialization part may involve reading of profile pages and some personal information of other members in the community, being able to share confidential and public information and by social media networking; you can organize and merge them all in your online profile.

Making friends is just one of the many benefits of engaging yourself in the social networking websites. Another is the diversity because the internet gives you the chance to give out information since most the internet users gain access in the internet. Meaning, you are able to organize and combine all your profile into one page, giving out a more personal profile in real life today.

The friends that you are able to engage via in social networking give individuals the venue to share talents and other vital information that can be mutually beneficial to both parties. They can be mutually beneficial in the sense that they would be able to help each other bring business and from now only an online friendship but as business associates as well.

As stated, social networking is often involved in groupings, specifically individuals or organizations coming together into one bigger group. While some social community websites focus on a particular interest, others do not. Once you are in the social networking community, you are now free to create your own group with specific interests and have the freedom to accept and eliminate group members if they don’t meet your standards or if they don’t share a common interest with the rest of the group.

Moreover, social networking involves groupings and forming communities of specific interests and likes, and both social and business interests.

Value of Networking + Informational Interviewing Tips

I recently facilitated the ASTD Training Certificate Program sponsored by the ASTD Ft. Worth, TX chapter. One of my participants was a gal named Eileen from California. Eileen is transitioning from Sales Management in the Pharmaceutical industry in to training and development. Eileen will be fabulous – she has excellent business acumen, in-depth industry experience, a natural energy and zest for learning, and great facilitation skills. She was a joy to have in our session!

As I mentioned, Eileen is transitioning into the workplace learning and performance/training and development profession. She’s asking the right questions to gather the information and perspective she needs to be successful. Eileen just wrote me today with a networking update:

“… speaking of networking, I have just learned the valuable lesson of always getting your job search message out complete with your professional objective.

Monday night while sitting around after playing a tennis match, the other members of the team asked about my class that I had taken through ASTD. I raved on about the class and about you. One of the players whom I don’t know very well sat listening intently and then asked a few more questions about what type of job I was looking to transition into. I provided a recap of my past employment, my skills and my goals about breaking into the training and development industry.

She then says to me, “You know, you should speak with my mother-in-law, she OWNS a training and development company”!!! Amazing, huh?”

So Eileen is on the right track to make her transition successful! She now has an informational interview set up with the owner of the training company. Eileen asked me for suggestions on questions that she should not miss asking. Below are some thoughts I shared. Read on, and then let me know what powerful questions you recommend for information interviews?

  • What do you recommend I do to prepare for a position In your company/department should one become available?” Take good notes, then if you are really interested in that company/department, start doing what they suggest!
  • What concerns would you have about hiring me?” or some variation… the goal is to ferret out information that may be holding you back without you being aware of it.
  • Similarly, ask “if you had a position available, why would you hire me?” or some variation – try to discover what the person you are talking with sees as your strengths that you may not recognize (or to reinforce what you know to be true about yourself and to help them see it as well).
  • Be sure to find out about the types of clients they work with, the type of work they do… “Describe a typical day in your job for me.” They likely won’t have a “typical” day, but you want to get a feel for the variety of activities and responsibilities in their work. Of course, if you are talking to the owner of a company that has people/trainers working for them, you may want to modify to “a typical day for your trainers” or whichever position you are interested in.
  • It is always good to ask about the pleasures and frustrations they experience in their role/company. This will help you be realistic about future positions you may land in.
  • I’d also recommend asking the person you are talking with to describe her perfect client, her company culture… all things to help you get a feel for if you’d want to work there or to help you narrow down the type of work you want to do and the type of environment in which to do it.

I hope these questions help Eileen. As I said, she is well on her way to a successful transition into my beloved profession.

We all need a little help from our friends via networking, informational interviews, and thoughts on how to prepare. What tips do you have for informational interviews?

What Is CPNI (Consumer Proprietary Network Information)?

The Consumer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI) is information that telecommunication services (I.E. local, long distance and wireless telephone carriers) acquire about their subscribers. The information that is collected typically includes the services they use, as well as the amount that they use these services and the type of usage.

To be more specific, the type of information the CPNI includes is the various data displayed on a customer’s monthly phone bill, which may include:

• Telephone line type and its technical characteristics

• Service class

• Existing phone charges

• Local and long distance service billing records

• Directory assistant charges

• Usage data

• Calling patterns

• All optional services to which the customer has subscribed

• And so on

Although the CPNI collects all of the above information of telephone customers, the CPNI does not include the customer’s personal information, such as their name, address or phone number. The only parties that are privy to this personal information are the customer and their telecommunications company.

Furthermore, it is important to note that the Telecommunications Act of 1996, together with the clarification from the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC), usually forbids the use of any information that is collected about a customer, even for marketing purposes, unless express permission to use the information is first given by the customer. In addition, if a customer switches service providers, the previous telecommunications carrier they were with, is not permitted to use any information in an attempt to lure the customer back.

However, the CPNI does not prohibit everything. For example, the CPNI rules do not forbid the gathering and publishing of aggregate customer information. Moreover, the CPNI rules do not prohibit the use of telephone subscribers’ information for the purpose of creating directories.

Keep in mind, a telecommunication provider must have their customer’s permission first before they can share their customer’s CPNI with any third party, including other agents, affiliates, or parent companies. That being said, generally, when a customer allows a telecommunications provider to share their CPNI, this helps the provider to better serve the customer and meet their service needs. Nevertheless, a customer has the right to notify their carrier that they withdraw their consent to have their CPNI shared whenever they wish, and their carrier must comply with their request.

It is important that you know your rights so you have the chance to protect yourself and your personal information. Therefore, should you feel that your rights are ever being violated, you can find out who owns a phone number [] and file a compliant with the FCC.